Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Toldos II

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In this week’s Torah portion, Toldos, we find a story filled with great intrigue. Yitzchok had aged; before his passing, he wanted to bless his firstborn, Aisov.

However, Yitzchok did not have all of the facts. Firstly, he was unaware that Aisov had already sold the rights and responsibilities that came together with being the firstborn (bechor) to his brother Yaakov. Secondly, Yitzchok was under the impression that Aisov was righteous and deserved his blessings. Aisov had managed to fool his father, as we discussed in the previous installment[1].

 As an introduction to blessing his son Aisov, we read that[2] “It came to pass when Yitzchok was old, and his eyes were too dim to see, that he called Aisov his elder son, and said to him, ‘My son.’ Aisov replied, ‘Here I am.'”

In his comments to this verse, Rashi offers several explanations for why Yitzchok’s eyes had dimmed. The final explanation which Rashi offers is that it was ” to allow Yaakov to take the blessings.”

This poses a question. Why did Hashem blind our Patriarch Yitzchok to enable Yaakov to receive the blessings (which were his)? It seems that there was a much simpler way. G-d could have let Yitzchok know that Aisov was wicked! Had He done that, naturally, the blessings would have gone to Yaakov.

The explanation is that Hashem follows that which He commands us to do. Just as we are forbidden to speak ill of another Jew, so too did Hashem refrain from doing so. The one option to assure that Yaakov would receive the Berochos was for Yitzchok to become blind.

Think about that. Keep in mind that Aisov and his descendants were to be enemies of the Jewish Nation throughout our long exile. Furthermore, Yitzchok was like a prisoner in his own house for 57 years as a result of this! Hashem withheld information from Yitzchok to avoid speaking poorly of Aisov.

How much more so is it true that we must never say anything that even hints at something negative regarding a fellow Jew.

The cause of our long exile is baseless hatred for our fellow Jews. The way to combat this, and thereby bring redemption, is by baseless love.

Wishing everyone a good Shabbos and a good month,

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 15, Page 215


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
MRS. MINDEL RIVKA (MURIEL) BAS REB MENACHEM MENDEL SHLOMO ע”ה STITT
PASSED AWAY ON SHABBAT PARSHAS LECH LECHA, 10 MAR-CHESHVAN, 5782
MAY HER SOUL BE BOUND IN THE ETERNAL BOND OF LIFE

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris


[1]. The source for this is Rashi’s comments to our Parshah, Bereishis 25:27.

[2]. Our Parshah, Bereishis, Bereishis 27:1.

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