Lubavitcher Rebbe

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Tazria–Metzora I

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This week’s Parshah, Tazria-Metzora, begins by teaching us the laws concerning a child’s birth. Hashem tells Moshe to[1] “Speak to the children of Israel, saying, “If a woman conceives and gives birth to a male, she shall be unclean for seven days. Just as in the days of her menstrual flow, shall she be unclean.'” Rashi cites the words “If a woman conceives” and writes as follows. “Rabbi Simla’i said, ‘Just as in the Creation, Hashem created a man after all domestic animals, wild beasts, and birds, so too, the law of man is stated after the law of domestic animals, wild beasts, and birds.'”

This means that Hashem created all of the animals and beasts before the man in the story of creation. The same is valid here. Last week’s Torah Portion, Tzav, concluded by teaching us animals, beasts, and bird’s purity and impurity, beasts, and birds. Our Parshah follows this by teaching us of the purity of people.

We need to understand the connection between the two. Rashi writes that
“Just as… so too …” This implies that the two are equal. Creation and purity are identical to each other. Why should this be so?

We can understand this based on the Alter Rebbe’s words in Tanya. In a specific manner, people are inferior to animals. A person has free will, which makes it possible to sin. The same is not true of an animal, who cannot possibly sin.

The difference between man and beast does not just relate to actual sin; it is the ability to sin. Therefore, the difference between the creation of animals and humans directly corresponds to their purity/impurity.

May we all make the correct and proper choice to follow Hashem. Thereby we will bring the redemption now!

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a healthy summer!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 7, Page 74


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE

מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF 

The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris 

DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS 

Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris 

לזכות

חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס

נדפס ע”י הוריהם

הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

Dedicated by Mr. Raziel שיחי’ Gates



[1]. Our Parshah, Vayikroh 12:2.

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Shemini I

Click here for a printable version.

This week we read the Torah portion of Shemini. In last week’s Parshah, we read of the seven days of preparing the Mishkan. Moshe would assemble it each day. This week we finally arrive at the point where the portable sanctuary would be ready for use; it would be used each day throughout the Jews’ sojourn in the wilderness.

The Torah tells us that Aharon’s oldest sons, Nodov and Avihu, participated in this occasion. They offered Ketores – Incense. “… each took his pan, put fire in them. They placed incense upon it, and they brought before Hashem foreign fire, which He had not commanded them.[1]” The result of this was tragic, as the Torah immediately exclaims[2], “fire went forth from before the Lord and consumed them, and they died before Hashem.”

Why did they receive such a severe punishment? Rashi cites two opinions of our Sages; Rabbi Eliezer and Rabbi Yishmoel. “Rabbi Eliezer says that Aharon’s sons only died because they rendered a halachic decision before Moshe, their teacher. Rabbi Yishmoel says that (the reason they died was that) they had entered the sanctuary after having drunk wine.”

What does this mean to us; what lesson can we learn from this? None of us can even remotely approach the exalted level of Nodov and Avihu. Nevertheless, “they only died because they rendered a halachic decision in the presence of Moshe, their teacher.” No matter how great one thinks he is or how great he is, he must always humble himself before his teacher. No one may declare himself a rabbi and believe that he has no reason to wait for someone else’s ruling. That was the sole reason that Aharon’s sons died; “they only died because they rendered a halachic decision in the presence of Moshe, their teacher.” Doing so pushes away the Shechinah. 

However, humility alone does not suffice. One must strive to grasp everything he learns to the best of his ability. As Rabbi Yishmoel said, the problem was that “they entered the sanctuary after having drunk wine.”  Wine is the spiritual idea of Binah, meaning understanding. Having drunk wine implies that one is at one with his understanding. That’s how we must learn. However, when we “enter the sanctuary,” when we are involved in prayer, it must be with the most incredible humility. 

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a healthy summer!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 12, Pages 49-56


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES



[1]. Our Parshah, Vayikroh 10:1.

[2]. Our Parshah, Vayikroh 10:2.


Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Shemini II

Click here for a printable version.

This Shabbos, we will read the Torah portion of Shemini, meaning “eighth.” The Jewish Nation spent seven days inaugurating the newly constructed Tabernacle. Finally, on the eighth day, we were to begin using it in earnest. Hashem’s presence would rest upon it.

It was a joyous time for the Jews. All of their dedication and toil in building the Mishkan would bear fruit! However, there was one incident that threatened to mar this celebration. The Torah tells us that as part of the service,[1] “…Aharon’s sons, Nodov and Avihu, each took his pan and put fire in them. They placed incense upon it and brought a foreign fire before Hashem, which He had not commanded them.” Immediately after that[2], “fire went forth from before G-d and consumed them, and they died before Hashem.” Rashi cites the words from this verse, “and the fire went forth,” and quotes the Midrash Rabbah[3]. The Midrash offers several opinions as to what sin it was that brought about their death.

One opinion which Rashi quotes is, “Rabbi Yishmoel says that they died because they had entered the Sanctuary after having drunk wine. The proof is that after their death, the Torah warned the survivors that they are not permitted to enter the Sanctuary after having drunk wine[4]. This is analogous to a king who had a faithful attendant, etc., as written in Vayikroh Rabbah.”

The Midrash to which Rashi alludes goes on to explain the analogy. “When the king found him standing at tavern entrances, he severed his head in silence and appointed another attendant in his place. We would not know why he executed the first, but for his commanding the second, ‘You must not enter the doorway of taverns.’ From this, we know why he put the first one to death.”

We need to understand this. If Rashi merely wants to show where to find the analogy source, he could have written: “as it says in Vayikroh Rabbah.” If he wishes to explain the analogy, why does he tell us the beginning of the explanation, i.e., that there was “a king who had a faithful attendant, etc.?”

The explanation is that Rashi is telling us all that we need to know. Nodov and Avihu were not yet commanded not to enter the Sanctuary after drinking wine. However, because they were faithful attendants, they were expected to realize that it was inappropriate behavior on their own without being told.

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a healthy summer!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 12, Page 49


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Vayikroh 10:1.

[2]. Vayikroh 10:2.

[3]. Vayikroh Rabbah 12, 1.

[4]. Vayikroh 10:9.

Pearls of Rashi: Shvi’ee Shel Pesach II

Click here for a printable version.

This Shabbos coincides with the seventh day of Pesach, which was the time of the splitting of the Red Sea. That is why our Torah reading describes this monumental miracle. The Jewish nation had left Egypt a week earlier. Pharaoh had a change of heart and decided to capture the Jews and restore them to their former status as slaves. The Egyptian troops were coming closer to the Jews from behind; in front of them, all they could see was the sea. It seemed hopeless. What did the Nation of Israel do?

The Torah tells us that[1] “Pharaoh drew near, and the children of Israel lifted their eyes, and behold! The Egyptians were coming after them. They were terrified, and they cried out to Hashem.” Rashi, explaining this verse, tells us why they cried to Hashem. “They grasped hold of their ancestor’s trade (meaning that they prayed).” Rashi then gives examples to demonstrate that each of our forefathers prayed.

We have discussed several times how precise Rashi is with his language. Why would he refer to prayer as a trade? One is regularly engaged in his career. On the other hand, prayer, which is a request for one’s needs, would seem to apply only when one has a need. This instance is a perfect example. The Jews felt that they were facing certain death, so of course, they prayed!

The explanation is that our perception of prayer is not correct. Prayer is not only a request for our needs. The Rambam writes that[2] “the positive commandment to pray is to serve Hashem every day through praying.”

The Rambam’s description of prayer teaches us that Tefillah is much more than a way of receiving our needs. Instead, it is a way to serve G-d, thereby coming closer to Him.

This is why Rashi specifically uses the word “trade” to describe prayer. We must continuously pray because we have a constant need to draw ourselves closer to Hashem. It is not merely an act we do to obtain our requirements; it is one of the most important ways to connect to Hashem.

Prayer serves the purpose of reminding ourselves that only Hashem can supply our needs. One constant need that we all have is the coming of Moshiach and our redemption from this exile. We should all pray for this, and Hashem will undoubtedly answer our prayers.

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a happy Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 11, Page 52


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Parshas Beshalach, Shemos 14:10.

[2]. See the heading to the Rambam’s Laws of Prayer. It is. known that he wrote the headings himself.

Pearls of Rashi: Shvi’ee Shel Pesach

Click here for a printable version.

This Shabbos, we celebrate the seventh day of Pesach. It commemorates the miracle of our passing through the Red Sea. As such, this is the topic of the Torah reading.

After this miracle, the Torah says that Moshe had to urge us to leave the Red Sea[1]. “Moshe led the Jews away from the Red Sea;” i.e., he caused us to travel away from the Red Sea. Rashi cites the words “Moshe led the Jews away” and explains that “he led them away against their will. The Egyptians had “crowned” their steeds with ornaments of gold, silver, and precious stones, and the Jews were finding them in the sea… Therefore, he had to lead them against their will.”

It seems quite clear from Rashi that had Moshe not led us away; we would not have left all that quickly. We wished to remain to get all of the gold, silver, and precious stones there.

Why was it so important for the Jews to plunder all of the wealth of Egypt? Hashem created the world because[2] “He desired to have a dwelling place below.” In one’s home, he reveals his complete essence. Hashem wanted to show His being specifically below, i.e., in a physical world, a world where His presence is not apparent.

Egypt was a place of evil. Its Hebrew name is Mitzrayim, which connotes limitations, as contrasted to the unlimited G-d. The idea of “emptying Egypt” was to take away their wealth and give it to the Jews who were on the verge of receiving the Torah and building the Tabernacle. In this manner, we would use the wealth Egyptians used for immoral purposes to create a world in which the Almighty can be “at home.”

 The lesson to be learned from this is clear. There comes a time that we become so involved in performing Hashem’s commandments’ that we will not stop for anything. We must learn from here that when the Shulchan Aruch or Moshe Rabbeinu (or his extension in every generation[3]) tells us to change gears, we must listen. We must always occupy ourselves with that which He wants at any and every point in time. This is true even if it means going “against our will.” This is the way for us to reach the complete redemption.

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a Kosher and Happy Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 21, Page 77


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Parshas Beshalach, Shemos 15:22.

[2]. See the Midrash Tanchumah Parshas Naso Chapter 16. See also Tanya at the beginning of Chapter 36.

[3]. See Tikkunei Zohar Chapter 469 (Pages 112, a and 114, a).

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Tzav II

Click here for a printable version.

This week’s Torah portion is Tzav. It is a continuation of last week’s Parshah. It begins with the laws of the burnt offering. Hashem tells Moshe to[1] “command Aharon and his sons, saying, ‘This is the law of the burnt offering. That is the burnt offering which burns on the altar all night until morning etc.’” Rashi cites the words from the verse, “this is the law of the burnt offering.” He explains that “this passage comes to teach us that of the fats and parts the burning of an animal is valid throughout the entire night[2].” The Talmud teaches us[3] that the primary time for burning fats is during the day. However, they may be burnt at night as well.

Everything in Torah teaches us a practical lesson in serving Hashem. What lesson can we learn from the above?

“The main time for burning the fats is during the day.” The word day signifies light and revelation, as the Torah says,[4] “And Hashem called the light day …” This refers to the service of Torah and Mitzvos, through which one brings Divine light into the world. The fact is that that “they may be burnt at night as well.” Night represents darkness, i.e., the concealment of G-dliness. This refers to one being occupied with mundane matters, such as conducting business or the like. These are things that are permissible according to Torah law. Nevertheless, they conceal our true purpose in this world.

The meaning of burning the fats (which symbolize pleasure) during the day is burning the personal pleasure we derive from our service of Hashem. Our only purpose for serving G-d should be order to fulfill His will[5].

Burning the fats at night, however, alludes to burning the pleasure we derive from worldly matters. All such things must be performed for the sake of heaven; one must be occupied in providing his children with a “Torah true” education, giving Tzedokoh, etc.

As quoted earlier from the Talmud, the only time for burning fats is during the daytime. We must perform mundane acts for Hashem’s sake. However, it is of greater importance that we must strive to study Torah and perform Mitzvos to serve Hashem.

I wish one and all wonderful Shabbos and a happy and Kosher Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 3, Page 950


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Our Parshah, Vayikroh 6:2.

[2]. The various parts of the animal may continue burning on the altar throughout the night, following the day on which it was brought.

[3]. See Tractate Menochos 72.

[4]. Parshas Bereishis, Bereishis 1:5.

[5]. Please note, that serving Hashem even for personal reasons is perfectly acceptable. What is written in the text is our goal.

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Tzav

Click here for a printable version.

This week’s Parshah, Tzav, continues where last week’s left off. It discusses sacrifices brought in the Mishkan, the Holy Temple, and those which will be brought in the Third Temple.

One of the offerings our Torah Portion discusses is a Thanksgiving Offering. The Torah tells us that[1] “If he is bringing it as a thanksgiving offering …”

Rashi quotes the words “If he is bringing it as a thanksgiving-offering, and explains “if (he is bringing it) to give thanks (to Hashem) for a miracle that had happened to him. For example, those who made a sea-voyage, journeyed in the desert, had been imprisoned, or a sick person who recovered.”

Rashi is telling us four events for which one must bring this offering, thereby giving thanks to Hashem; one who survives a sea-voyage, a journey in the desert, prison, or sickness. Rashi is very precise. We need to understand why Rashi lists these four occurrences in this particular order.

All four of these happened to the Jews throughout their forty years in the wilderness. Each took place in the order in which Rashi listed them.

Our ancestors began their forty-year trek through the desert by making a “sea-voyage,” i.e., traveling through the Red Sea. This started their “journey through the desert.” After this journey began, Hashem decreed that we would remain in the desert for forty years. We were locked in “prison.” It was only after traversing the desert forty years that it was clear that not one of the Jews became a “sick person.” 

Each one of us experiences the many journeys of the Jewish Nation throughout our lifetimes. Hashem is constantly guarding us, protecting us from all of the pitfalls surrounding us. Hashem should give us the insight to recognize His providence and to thank Him for each moment. These moments are all bringing us closer to entering the “Promised Land” with the coming of Moshiach Now.

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a Kosher and Happy Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 12, Page20   



DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES



[1]. Our Parshah, Vayikroh 7:12.

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Vayikroh

Click here for a printable version.

This week we begin studying and reading Vayikroh, the third book of the Torah. It teaches us of the many sacrifices and offerings which we would bring in the Sanctuary.

After telling us that Hashem called to Moshe, the Torah tells us that He told Moshe[1] to “Speak to the Jewish Nation and say to them, ‘When a man from among you brings a sacrifice to the Lord; from animals, from cattle or the flock you shall bring your sacrifice.'” Rashi cites the words “when a man from among you brings a sacrifice” and explains that “voluntary sacrifices is the concept which is under discussion.” In other words, Rashi makes it clear that the Torah begins teaching the laws of voluntary offerings.

Why does the Torah start by teaching us the rules of one who donates a sacrifice? It would seem more appropriate to begin with the law of an obligatory sacrifice.

The main point of an offering is not the sacrifice itself. It is neither the animal nor the grain and wine brought together with the animal. Instead, it is the intent and thought which goes into the offering. We know this from the words of the Sages[2]. “Whether one gives much or little (it is equally pleasing to Hashem), provided that he directs his heart to Heaven.” The same is true of mandatory sacrifices, which serve to atone for sin. The atonement occurs due to the thought that goes into the offering, not the actual animal and that which accompanies it.

The root of the Hebrew word for a sacrifice, “Korbon – קרבן,” is related to the word “Kiruv – קירוב,” which means drawing close. The idea of a sacrifice is to bring one’s abilities and senses closer to Hashem[3].

To teach us this all-important factor, the Torah begins the laws of sacrifices by telling us of free-will offerings. It describes offerings which one brings from the generosity of his heart. It does so to let us know that the heart is the introduction to all of the sacrifices.

Because each Jew has a Divine soul which is a veritable part of Hashem[4], he wants to come closer (Korbon – קרבן) to G-d from the depths of his soul.

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a Kosher and Happy Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 17, Pages 9-16   


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Our Parshah, Vayikroh 1:2.

[2]. See the end of Talmud Menochos. See also Rashi’s comments to our Parshah, Vayikroh 1:17 and 2:1. 

[3]. See Sefer Habahir, Chapter 46. See also Zohar Section III, Page 5, a. This is also found in Sheloh Tractate Taanis, Page 211, Side b, and in Pri Eitz Chaim, The Gate of Tefillah Chapter 5.

[4]. See Tanya, the beginning of Chapter 2.

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Vayakhel-Pekudei II

Click here for a printable version.

At the end of this week’s Torah portion, Vayakhel-Pekudei, we complete the Torah’s second book, Shemos. Our Parshah ends with the words,[1] “For the cloud of Hashem was upon the Mishkan by day, and there was fire within it at night. This was before the eyes of the entire house of Israel in all their journeys.” Rashi cites the words “before the eyes of the entire house of Israel in all their journeys.” He explains that “Since from the place of their encampment they resumed their journeys, they are all called journeys.” In other words, he is saying that the encampments are a part of the journey.

The beginning and the end of something are always closely connected. This is true of the opening and conclusion of the book of Shemos. The book begins with us being on the lowest possible level. We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt.

As the story progresses, the Jewish Nation reaches the most incredible heights. We draw G-dliness into this world through our miraculous exodus from Egypt, receiving the Torah directly from Hashem at Mount Sinai, and building the Tabernacle, Hashem’s resting place in this world. What connection could there possibly be between our humble beginning and our glory at the end of Shemos?

This book’s conclusion emphasizes that the significant elevation we experienced began while we were still slaves in Egypt. That marked the beginning of our redemption. Rashi is telling us here that our camping in Egypt was also a journey; we were going onward and upward. This brought us a step closer to our redemption from Egypt and our ultimate deliverance from our present Gallus.

At times it may seem that we are far from reaching our goal. However, as we continue to strive, we will surely achieve the purpose of Moshiach now!

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a Kosher and Happy Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn

Adapted from Likkutei Sichos Volume 6, Page 238


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Our Parshah, Shemos 40:38.

Pearls of Rashi: Parshas Vayakhel-Pekudei I

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In this week’s Torah portion, Vayakhel-Pekudei, the Torah audits the Jews’ donations to build the Tabernacle. The Torah tells us that[1] “these are the numbers of the Mishkan, the Mishkan of the Testimony, which was counted at Moshe’s command…” The seemingly redundant use of the word “Mishkan seems to bother Rashi. He comments that the Torah writes the word Mishkan (משכן ) twice. The double-expression alludes to the Temple, which was taken as security (מַשְׁכּוֹן ) by the two destructions, for Israel’s sins.” Rashi is pointing out that the Hebrew word Mishkan (Tabernacle) is related to the word Mashkon (security).

What is the meaning of security? A security is that which the lender holds for a fixed amount of time. However, it remains intact. We will behold the building of the third Bais Hamikdosh. At that time, Hashem will restore to us both the first and second Temples with all of their grandeur.

What is the significance of the words “Mishkan of the Testimony?” Whatever occurs during the time of Moshiach will be the direct result of our behavior now, during the time of exile.

            Hashem calls us His witnesses[2], “You are My witnesses.” The Jews testify to, reveal, and tell the world of Hashem’s presence. We are following in the footsteps of our forefather Avrohom3, who called out (and caused others to call out) in the name of Hashem.

So too, during our current exile we are building the “Mishkan of Testimony.” Through our present actions, we are making the Third Bais Hamikdosh. Our Sages describe this as4 “Testimony to all of the inhabitants of the earth that G-d’s presence rests in the world. May we merit to see this soon with our own eyes.

I wish one and all a good Shabbos and a Kosher Pesach!

Rabbi Shmuel Mendelsohn Adapted from Hisva’adus Shabbos Kodesh Parshas Vayakhel-Pekudei 5747, Page 673


DEDICATED IN HONOR OF THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE
מוקדש לזכות כ”ק אדמו”ר נשיא דורנו מליובאוויטש

IN HONOR OF
The Soldiers of Tzivos Hashem Chaim and Aiden Oded שיחיו Morris
DEDICATED BY THEIR PARENTS
Rabbi & Mrs. Menachem M. and Chaya Mushka שיחיו Morris

לזכות
חיילי “צבאות השם” חיים ועדן עודד שיחיו מאריס
נדפס ע”י הוריהם
הרה”ת ר’ מנחם מענדל וזוגתו מרת חי’ מושקא שיחיו מאריס

DEDICATED BY MR. RAZIEL שיחי’ GATES


[1]. Our Parshah, Shemos 38:21.

[2]. Yeshaya 43:10.